Book review: Inferno by Dan Brown (Spoiler-free)

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My mother decided to buy the newest of Brown’s literary babies and because I can’t help myself, I took it and read it before she even arrived at the fourth chapter. Which means that Dan’s books are -let’s face it- nothing but slow.

Another fast-paced thriller, we’re following Indiana Jones/Hercule Poirot Robert Langdon in another adventure. This time we’re situated in Florence (or, as Italians call it, Firenze) and instead of moving forward, we have to move backwards and retrace our hero’s steps, since he’s lost his memory.

Pros

Pros are easy. For once, it’s a page-turner. He won’t really bore you with details, since there’s no time for them. It also serves as a tourist guide (as most of Brown’s books) which, if you haven’t visited the places described already, will probably have you at Googling around every single place mentioned. It is a simple book that is read easily and also provides some food for thought.

Cons

Have you ever had the feeling you’ve heard that song somewhere, you’ve seen that face sometime, you’ve been in this place somehow, you’ve had this conversation with these people, even though you haven’t?

No?

Have you ever had the feeling you’ve heard that song somewhere, you’ve seen that face sometime, you’ve been in this place somehow, you’ve had this conversation with these people, even though you haven’t?

What about now?

Well, the whole book is a déjà vu; maybe prof. Langdon was suffering from amnesia, but I’m not. It wasn’t as well plotted as Angels and Demons, didn’t culturally shock us as much as the Da Vinci Code, it didn’t delve into dark places like the Lost Symbol did.

Sure, his previous ones were no literary gems, but they were crafted in a way you felt like something bigger -much bigger than anything you know- was going on. You don’t have this here. It’s just a mediocre, predictable thriller that manages to deliver zero “Oh!”s.

It’s sad when you feel like you’re reading just a Wikipedia article, only with a lesser plot.

Overall

It’s a fun ride at many famous sites of Italy and it’s an enjoyable book overall, just don’t expect any jaw-dropping moments here. Also, after three books/incidents of life-threatening situations, you’d expect your professor to take a karate lesson or something. Just saying. And, finally, you’d expect a book about Dante’s Inferno to have more to do about Dante’s Inferno instead of obscure brandnamedropping. This book will definitely not line up with other literary stars.

 

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